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Turkey at Poultry Show

Turkey Head


Turkey HeadTurkeys on Allotments

Turkeys can be expensive to feed but on allotments there are many opportunities for growing your own poultry freed. The domesticated turkey is a large poultry bird raised for food.

The modern domesticated turkey descends from the wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), one of the two species of turkey (genus Meleagris); however, in the past the ocellated turkey (Meleagris ocellata) was also domesticated. Despite the name, turkeys have no relation to the country of Turkey and are instead native to North America. The majority of domesticated turkeys have white feathers, although brown or bronze-feathered varieties are also raised.

The turkey is reared throughout temperate parts of the world, and is a popular form of poultry, partially because industrialized farming has made it very cheap for the amount of meat it produces. The female domesticated turkey is referred to as a hen and the chick as a poult. In the United States, the male is referred to as a tom, whilst in Europe, the male is a stag.

Turkeys have a distinctive fleshy carbuncle that hangs from the beak, called a snood. As with many galliform species, the female is smaller than the male, and much less colorful. With wingspans of 1.5–1.8 meters (almost 6 feet), the turkeys are by far the largest birds in the open forests in which they live, and are rarely mistaken for any other species. The usual lifespan for a turkey is 10 years.

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Domestic Turkeys
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White Turkey Bird
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Turkey Bird
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Turkey Male

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